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Sixth-grade students will begin the study of word origins and continue vocabulary development. In fiction texts, students will identify elements of narrative structure including identifying themes and analyzing figurative language. There is an increased emphasis on nonfiction reading by creating objective summaries and drawing inferences using textual evidence. These critical-thinking skills are foundational to technical reading and writing and are transferable across content areas. Students will continue to develop as readers and writers. Students will also plan, draft, revise, and edit writing in a variety of forms with an emphasis on narrative and reflective writing. Students will write multi-paragraph compositions with an emphasis on the development of elaboration and unity. Students will be expected to have greater control over the conventions of writing.  Teachers will emphasize the importance of effective critical-thinking skills that lead to success in future postsecondary education and workplace environments.
Seventh-grade students will continue to develop oral communication skills and will become more knowledgeable of the effects of verbal and nonverbal behaviors in oral communication. The students will continue to read a wide variety of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry while becoming more independent, self-sufficient, and analytical. The students will continue to refine written composition skills, with special attention to word choice, organization, style, structure, and grammar. Written explanations will utilize informational writing skills. The student will continue to expand on prior vocabulary skills and continuously develop vocabulary through a study of figurative language and an ongoing study of roots, affixes, and cognates. Knowledge of the informative, as well as persuasive techniques of media messages, will be studied. The students will apply research techniques to gather, organize, and communicate information, properly citing sources. The student will also demonstrate correct use of language, spelling, and mechanics by applying grammatical conventions in writing and speaking.

 

The eighth-grade students will develop and deliver oral presentations both in groups as well as individually. The students will demonstrate correct use of language, spelling, and mechanics by applying grammatical conventions in writing and speaking. The students will plan, draft, revise, and edit writing. The student will apply reading and writing skills in all subjects, as well as respond critically to literature. The student will continue development of vocabulary, with attention to Greek and Latin roots, connotations and figurative language. Eighth-grade students will continue to develop an appreciation for literary genres through a study of a wide variety of selections, including various novel studies. The student will describe themes, make inferences, interpret cause and effect relationships, and draw conclusions from a variety of texts.
This course focuses on literature from Western countries (excluding the United States, England, and Canada).  Students will discuss how the literature reflects the culture and history of the society. Compositions will include both formal and informal writings such as literary analysis, research, reflection, and personal narrative. The research paper will address an issue in a Western country. The course’s literary component includes both fiction and nonfiction pieces including epics, poetry, romances, mythology, drama, short stories, novels, articles, and nonprint media.
This course focuses on literature from Eastern countries.  Students will discuss how the literature reflects the culture and history of the society. Eastern literature builds upon skills learned in Western literature. Compositions will include both formal and informal writings such as rhetorical analysis, literary analysis, research, and reflection. The research paper is a modified version of the type of writing expected in the next course. The course’s literary component includes both fiction and nonfiction pieces including epics, poetry, mythology, drama, short stories, novels, articles, essays, speeches, memoirs, and nonprint media.
AP Seminar is a foundational course that engages students in cross-curricular conversations that explore the complexities of academic and real-world topics and issues by analyzing divergent perspectives. Using an inquiry framework, students practice reading and analyzing articles, research studies, and foundational, literary, and philosophical texts; listening to and viewing speeches, broadcasts, and personal accounts; and experiencing artistic works and performances. Students learn to synthesize information from multiple sources, develop their own perspectives in written essays, and design and deliver oral and visual presentations, both individually and as part of a team. Ultimately, the course aims to equip students with the power to analyze and evaluate information with accuracy and precision in order to craft and communicate evidence-based arguments.
AP Research, the second course in the AP Capstone experience, allows students to deeply explore an academic topic, problem, issue, or idea of individual interest. Students design, plan, and implement a yearlong investigation to address a research question. Through this inquiry, they further the skills they acquired in the AP Seminar course by learning research methodology, employing ethical research practices, and accessing, analyzing, and synthesizing information. Students reflect on their skill development, document their processes, and curate the artifacts of their scholarly work through a process and reflection portfolio. The course culminates in an academic paper of 4,000–5,000 words (accompanied by a performance, exhibit, or product where applicable) and a presentation with an oral defense.

 

The AP English Literature and Composition course focuses on reading, analyzing, and writing about imaginative literature (fiction, poetry, drama) from various periods. Students engage in close reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature to deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure. As they read, students consider a work’s structure, style, and themes, as well as its use of figurative language, imagery, and symbolism. Writing assignments include expository, analytical, and argumentative essays that require students to analyze and interpret literary works.
 
Careful reading and critical analysis of such works of fiction, drama, and poetry provide rich opportunities for students to develop an appreciation of the ways literature reflects and comments on a range of experiences, institutions, and social structures. Students will examine the choices literary writers make and the techniques they utilize to achieve purposes and generate meanings.
The AP English Language and Composition course focuses on the development and revision of evidence-based analytic and argumentative writing, the rhetorical analysis of nonfiction texts, and the decisions writers make as they compose and revise. Students evaluate, synthesize, and cite research to support their arguments. Additionally, they read and analyze rhetorical elements and their effects in nonfiction texts—including images as forms of text—from a range of disciplines and historical periods. An AP English Language and Composition course cultivates reading and writing skills that students need for college success and intellectually responsible civic engagement. The course guides students in becoming curious, critical, and responsive readers of diverse texts and becoming flexible, reflective writers of texts addressed to diverse audiences for various purposes. Students' reading and writing in the course should deepen and expand their understanding of how written language functions rhetorically: to communicate writers' intentions and elicit readers' responses in particular situations.

World Languages

Introduction to World Languages is a foundation of Romance Language development, beginning with an intensive study of Latin, followed by an introduction of Spanish and French.  This course is offered in 6th grade. The course fosters a deep understanding of Romance language roots and thus an appreciation of how languages were formed and used today.  Students gain novice proficiency across the domains of writing, speaking, listening, and reading in Latin, Spanish, and French. In the second semester, the students explore Spanish and French.  Each course builds a foundation for success in advanced placement for World Languages classes.
 
In Latin, the course introduces students to the rudiments of Latin grammar, syntax, and vocabulary with a view to enabling them to read and comprehend (modified) texts in the original language. Students are required to complete a variety of language tasks including translation both into and from Latin and answering comprehension questions on passages in Latin. This course develops students' ability to identify and analyze fundamental grammatical constructions and improves their comprehension skills.
 
The study of French or Spanish, as members of the Romance Language family, aids students in the ability to identify vocabulary, syntax, and grammatical structures related to Latin. In this semester class, the students are introduced to beginning structures of grammar and vocabulary as well as culture, history, and geography. By beginning the course with Latin, our students are set up for success in their study of Spanish, French, and English.
Middle School Spanish is an introduction to World Languages. Students who take level one of a World Language begin a journey of adding a new language and culture to their life experiences. The course fosters a love for world languages by immersing students in highly comprehensible and engaging lessons that use Spanish as often as possible. Students gain novice proficiency across the domains of writing, speaking, listening, and reading in lessons that model real-world environments and follow students’ interests. They use language to solve problems as well as to investigate personal interests and academic themes. The course explores other cultures associated with Spanish and connects students to communities that live and thrive in this language. Students use the language to advance their learning in English and gain a deeper understanding of the common threads that unite all languages. The course builds a foundation for success in advanced placement world language courses; thus, it draws from themes common in the advanced placement curriculum framework, including personal identity, contemporary life, and family.
 
Middle school students complete an exploratory level of Spanish over the course of sixth grade. Each week offers 4 hours of instructional time. Middle School Spanish focuses on the development of students’ communicative competence in Spanish and the understanding of the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world.  The American Council for the Teaching of Foreign Language standards for learning languages guide program goals and expectations. At the end of sixth grade, students will demonstrate the skills necessary to exchange and sustain oral and written communication at the Novice-mid proficiency level.
Spanish I is an introduction to world languages. Students who take level one of a world language begin a journey of adding a new language and culture to their life experiences. The course fosters a love for world languages by immersing students in highly comprehensible and engaging Spanish lessons as often as possible. Students gain novice proficiency across writing, speaking, listening, and reading in studies that model real-world environments and follow students' interests. They use language to solve problems and investigate personal interests and academic themes. The course explores other cultures associated with Spanish and connects students to communities that live and thrive in this language. Students use the language to advance their learning in English and gain a deeper understanding of the common threads that unite all languages. The course builds a foundation for success in advanced placement world language courses; thus, it draws from themes common in the advanced placement curriculum framework, including personal identity, contemporary life, and family.
 
Middle and upper school students complete Spanish I in one year. Students attend class three times a week for a total of 4 hours.  Level one focuses on the development of students’ communicative competence in Spanish and the understanding of the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world.  The American Council for the Teaching of Foreign Language standards for learning languages guide program goals and expectations are observed in our program. At the end of level one students will demonstrate the skills necessary to exchange and sustain oral and written communication at the Novice-mid proficiency level.
The main objective of Spanish II is to continue developing the students’ communicative competence. The program will continue using a progressive approach at a more complex level. Upper school students’ communicative competence will be expanded. Students will interact orally with other Spanish speakers and make language meaningful with application projects that will challenge their minds.  Students will start showing a greater level of accuracy of the basic material of Spanish I. Students will be exposed to content-based material from different sources that will help students’ communicative competence to progress. The emphasis of the course is on communication. Students use the target language in the classroom and use authentic materials to continue expanding their understanding of the Spanish-speaking cultures. Students meet three times a week for a total of 4 hours.
 
The cultural content of the program provides the students with a means toward understanding a global perspective and the comparisons and connections through the course maximize the meaning and purpose of the knowledge of the language.
 
The grammar supports communication and is practiced communicatively.  The student learns grammar in a real-life context. Many opportunities for oral and written communications are expanded through the use of technology.

 

The main objective of Spanish III is to continue developing the students’ communicative competence. The program will continue using a progressive approach at a more complex level. Upper school students’ communicative competence will be expanded. Students will interact orally with other Spanish speakers and make language meaningful with application projects that will challenge their minds. Students will make oral and written presentations in Spanish.  Students will start showing a greater level of accuracy of the material studied in Spanish II. Students will be exposed to content-based material from different sources that will help students’ communicative competence to progress. The emphasis of the course is on communication. Oral discussions on historical and contemporary events will intensify and reflect positive outcomes on the student’s oral communication output. Students use the target language in the classroom and use authentic materials to continue expanding their understanding of the Spanish-speaking cultures. Students meet three times a week for a total of 4 hours.
 
The cultural content of the program provides the students with a means toward understanding a global perspective and the comparisons and connections through the course maximize the meaning and purpose of the knowledge of the language.
 
The grammar supports communication and is practiced communicatively.  The student learns grammar in a real-life context. Many opportunities for oral and written communications are expanded through the use of technology.

 

The main objective of Spanish IV is to continue developing the students’ communicative competence. The program will continue using a progressive approach at a more complex level. Upper school students’ communicative competence will be expanded and refined. Students will interact orally with other Spanish speakers and make language meaningful with application projects that will challenge their minds. Students will make oral and written presentations in Spanish.  Students will be exposed to content-based material from different sources that will help students’ communicative competence to progress to a higher level. The emphasis of the course is to refine all the language skills. Oral discussions on historical and contemporary events will intensify and reflect positive outcomes on the student’s oral communication output. Students use the target language in the classroom and use authentic materials to continue expounding their understanding of the Spanish-speaking cultures. The course will place special emphasis in conversation, composition, and literary analysis.
 
The cultural content of the program provides the students with a means toward understanding a global perspective and the comparisons and connections through the course maximize the meaning and purpose of the knowledge of the language.
 
The intermediate and advanced grammar supports communication and is practiced communicatively.  The student learns grammar in a real-life context. Many opportunities for oral and written communications are expanded through the use of technology.

 

Middle School French is an introduction to World Languages. Students who take level one of a World Language begin a journey of adding a new language and culture to their life experiences. The course fosters a love for world languages by immersing students in highly comprehensible and engaging lessons that use French as often as possible. Students gain novice proficiency across the domains of writing, speaking, listening, and reading in lessons that model real-world environments and follow students’ interests. They use language to solve problems as well as to investigate personal interests and academic themes. The course explores other cultures associated with French and connects students to communities that live and thrive in this language. Students use the language to advance their learning in English and gain a deeper understanding of the common threads that unite all languages. The course builds a foundation for success in advanced placement world language courses; thus, it draws from themes common in the advanced placement curriculum framework, including personal identity, contemporary life, and family.
 
Middle school students complete an exploratory level of French over the course of sixth grade. Each week offers 4 hours of instructional time. Middle School French focuses on the development of students’ communicative competence in French and the understanding of the cultures of the Francophone world.  The American Council for the Teaching of Foreign Language standards for learning languages guide program goals and expectations. At the end of sixth grade, students will demonstrate the skills necessary to exchange and sustain oral and written communication at the Novice-mid proficiency level.
French I is an introduction to world languages. Students who take level one of a world language begin a journey of adding a new language and culture to their life experiences. The course fosters a love for world languages by immersing students in highly comprehensible and engaging lessons that use French as often as possible. Students gain novice proficiency across the domains of writing, speaking, listening, and reading in lessons that model real-world environments and follow students’ interests. They use language to solve problems as well as to investigate personal interests and academic themes. The course explores other cultures associated with French and connects students to communities that live and thrive in this language. Students use the language to advance their learning in English and gain a deeper understanding of the common threads that unite all languages. The course builds a foundation for success in advanced placement world language courses; thus it draws from themes common in the advanced placement curriculum framework including personal identity, contemporary life, and family.
 
Middle and Upper School students complete French I in one year. Students attend class three times a week for 4 hours of instruction.  Level one focuses on the development of students’ communicative competence in French and the understanding of the cultures of the Francophone world.  The American Council for the Teaching of Foreign Language standards for learning languages guide program goals and expectations. At the end of level one students will demonstrate the skills necessary to exchange and sustain oral and written communication at the Novice-mid proficiency level.
This course continues to build on skills learned in the first year of the language by engaging students in immersive classroom environments. Students focus extensively on building capacity and confidence to speak in French and build proficiency in listening, reading, writing, and culture. Students will participate in projects and field experiences that connect with cultures and communities that use French and explore themes of families and communities, beauty and aesthetics, contemporary life, and global challenges. Students continue to build a strong foundation for multicultural and multilingual academic success. 
 
Upper school students complete French II over the course of one academic year. Students meet three times a week for 4 hours of instructional time.  Level two focuses on the further development of students’ communicative competence in French and the understanding of the cultures of the Francophone world.  The American Council for the Teaching of Foreign Language standards for learning languages guide program goals and expectations. At the end of level two, students will demonstrate the skills necessary to exchange and sustain oral and written communication at the Novice-high proficiency level.
This course is conducted almost entirely in French and refines speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills while emphasizing vocabulary growth. Students explore the linguistic and cultural heritage of peoples associated with French in regions throughout the world with themes that include personal and public identities, science and technology, beauty and aesthetics, as well as global challenges. Students achieve intermediate-level proficiency in French through rigorous study in an immersive environment. The course builds a foundation for success in advanced placement world language courses; thus it draws from themes common in the advanced placement curriculum framework.
 
Upper school students complete level three over the course of one academic year. Students meet three times a week for 4 hours of instructional time.  Level three focuses on further developing students’ communicative competence in French and the understanding of the cultures of the Francophone world.  The American Council for the Teaching of Foreign Language standards for learning languages guide program goals and expectations. At the end of level three, students will demonstrate the skills necessary to exchange and sustain extended oral and written communication at the Intermediate low proficiency level.
The main objective of French IV is to continue developing the students' communicative competence. The program will continue using a progressive approach at a more complex level. Upper School students' communicative competence will be expanded and refined. Students will interact orally with other French speakers and make language meaningful with application projects that will challenge their minds. Students will make oral and written presentations in French. Students will be exposed to content-based material from different sources that will help students' communicative competence to progress to a higher level. The emphasis of the course is to refine all the language skills. Oral discussions on historical and contemporary events will intensify and reflect positive outcomes on the student's verbal communication output. Students use the target language in the classroom and use authentic materials to expand their understanding of the French-speaking cultures. The course will emphasize conversation, composition, and literary analysis.
The AP French Language and Culture course emphasize communication (understanding and being understood by others) by applying interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational skills in real-life situations. This includes vocabulary usage, language control, communication strategies, and cultural awareness. The AP French Language and Culture course strive not to overemphasize grammatical accuracy at the expense of communication. The course is taught almost exclusively in French to facilitate the study of language and culture best. The AP French Language and Culture course engages students in exploring the culture in both contemporary and historical contexts. The course develops students' awareness and appreciation of cultural products (e.g., tools, books, music, laws, conventions, institutions), practices (patterns of social interactions within a culture), and perspectives (values, attitudes, and assumptions).

Social Studies

World Cultures class is designed to introduce students to the historical development of people, places, and patterns of life from ancient times until the present.  Students study the origins of human heritage using texts, maps, pictures, stories, diagrams, and charts. The students will identify and describe environmental and cultural factors that influence the lives of people within a nation, major changes in a society; interpret special purpose maps, charts, diagrams, and political cartoons; identify and describe important periods and events of world history, and compare to current events; identify the origin and development of various forms of government, and recognize the diversity of cultures around the world.
 
The primary focus of this class includes the human geography, people, and culture in Western Europe, UK, Eastern Europe, Egypt & North Africa, West Africa, East, Central, and South Africa, India and its South Asian neighbors, China, Japan, and Russia.

 

The Americas class is designed to introduce students to the historical development of people, places, and patterns of life from ancient times until the present in Latin American countries, the United States, and Canada.  Students study the origins of human heritage in the regions using texts, maps, pictures, stories, diagrams, and charts. The students will identify and describe environmental and cultural factors that influence the lives of people within a nation, major changes in a society, and interpret special purpose maps, charts, and diagrams. The students will identify and describe important periods and events in the history of the Americas and compare them to current events, identify the development of various forms of government, and recognize the diversity of cultures in this part of the world.
World Geography class is designed to help students develop a deeper understanding of their world by making personal connections to the people and places they learn about in lessons and activities that include: “myStory” real-life stories of personal accounts of teens from all over the world that let them develop an awareness and then relate to the experiences of their international peers’ cultures and regions; digital activities using technology linked to the text and stories, games; simulations, map work, and projects. The students will practice using higher-level thinking, problem-solving, and open-ended questions to unlock answers about the world. The students will analyze and use core concepts of geography including Map Skills and Tools, Human-Environment Interaction, Economics, Population and Movement, Culture, Government, Citizenship, and History.

 

In AP World History: Modern, students investigate significant events, individuals, developments, and processes from 1200 to the present. Students develop and use the same skills, practices, and methods employed by historians: analyzing primary and secondary sources; developing historical arguments; making historical connections; and utilizing reasoning about comparison, causation, continuity, and change over time. The course provides six themes that students explore throughout the course to make connections between historical developments in different times and places: humans and the environment, cultural effects and interactions, governance, economic systems, social interactions and organization, and technology and innovation.
The students study the emergence and development of Native American cultures, European encounters in the New World, the founding of the colonies, relations with Britain, the creation of the United States, its government, and growth as a young nation, global/domestic challenges, and sectional differences resulting in the Civil War, followed by the effects of imperialism, global involvement, socio-economic struggles and changes during the 20th century, and the emerging post-Cold War world order.
AP U.S. Government and Politics provides a college-level, nonpartisan introduction to key political concepts, ideas, institutions, policies, interactions, roles, and behaviors that characterize the constitutional system and political culture of the United States. Students will study U.S. foundational documents, Supreme Court decisions, and other texts and visuals to gain an understanding of the relationships and interactions among political institutions, processes, and behaviors. They will also engage in disciplinary practices that require them to read and interpret data, make comparisons and applications, and develop evidence-based arguments. In addition, they will complete a political science research or applied civics project.
This is a two-part course that will encompass both economics and personal finance. Students will be introduced to Economics as a body of knowledge that allows them to analyze how the actions of consumers throughout the world affect each of us as individuals on a daily basis. Specifically, how the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services are globally interconnected. After successful completion of the economics units, students will be introduced to the concept of Personal Finance as a methodology that includes the budgeting, managing, and investing of one’s source of income in order to help gain financial security and concurrently, avoid costly mistakes. This course is a one-credit requirement for all students for graduation.

Science

This course presents concepts from year one MYP Integrated Science, focusing on the interconnectedness of science topics. This course focuses on  inquiry topics including: What do scientists do? What does change look like in a scientific model? How do living things work? What makes change happen? How can we study the living world? And where do we fit into the world? The students will participate in experimental design and explore how these topics influence the world in which we live.
This course presents concepts from year two MYP Integrated Science, focusing on the interconnectedness of science topics. This course focuses on  inquiry topics including: Where are we now and where might we be going? How do we map matter? Who are we? What does a wave tell us? How does our planet work? How do we respond to our world?
Year three of MYP science is Integrated Science, focusing on the interconnectedness of science topics. Questions of inquiry this year are: How do we make it work? How do humans impact the natural world? What should I eat? How do we put electricity and magnetism to work? How can we connect? How do our bodies work? This course is part of the International Baccalaureate (IB) Middle Years Program (MYP), and thus assessments and evaluations have increased rigor and expectations. In addition, this class is designed to lay a strong background for future science courses.

 

Year four of MYP science is IB MYP Honors Biology.  It is a core academic course dedicated to understanding and mastering concepts in the study of life. Students will receive a foundation for future studies in biology and other science courses. This course is structured around three basic frameworks: Inquiry, Life Science, and Physical Science. Biology includes the study of the microscopic structure of single cells. It also includes the study of the global interactions of millions of organisms; the study of the life history of individual organisms as well as the collective history of all organisms; and the study of cell structure and function, stability and homeostasis, reproduction and inheritance, evolution, the interdependence of organisms, and matter, energy, and organization. Methods for mastering these concepts include, but are not limited to, laboratory activities, research, and technology use. This course is part of the International Baccalaureate (IB) Middle Years Program (MYP), and thus assessments and evaluations have increased rigor and expectations. In addition, this class is designed to lay a strong background for AP Biology.
Chemistry is the study of the interaction of matter and energy. These interactions are studied using laboratory activities, problem-solving, and analytical investigations, which focus upon environmental, nuclear, organic, and biochemistry content areas.  Heavy emphasis is placed on the conceptual background of each unit.
Mechanics is a calculus-based, college-level physics course. It covers kinematics; Newton’s laws of motion; work, energy, and power; systems of particles and linear momentum; circular motion and rotation; oscillations; and gravitation. 
 
The course content is organized into seven commonly taught units, which have been arranged in the following sequence:
 
Unit 1: Kinematics 
Unit 2: Newton’s Laws of Motion 
Unit 3: Work, Energy, and Power 
Unit 4: Systems of Particles and Linear Momentum 
Unit 5: Rotation 
Unit 6: Oscillations 
Unit 7: Gravitation
 
Each unit is broken down into teachable segments called topics. In addition, the following big ideas serve as the foundation of the course, enabling students to create meaningful connections among concepts and develop deeper conceptual understanding: 
 
■ Change: Interactions produce changes in motion 
■ Force Interactions: Forces characterize interactions between objects or systems 
■ Fields: Fields predict and describe interactions 
■ Conservation: Conservation laws constrain interactions
This introductory course in human anatomy and physiology covers the basics of human anatomy and physiology including anatomical terminology, basic biochemistry, cells and tissues, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic/immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. In addition, the course introduces common human disease processes.  The laboratory component includes anatomical studies using microscopy and dissection and the study of physiological concepts via experimentation.
The AP Psychology course introduces students to the systematic and scientific study of human behavior and mental processes. While considering the psychologists and studies that have shaped the field, students explore and apply psychological theories, key concepts, and phenomena associated with such topics as the biological bases of behavior, sensation, and perception, learning and cognition, motivation, developmental psychology, testing and individual differences, treatments of psychological disorders, and social psychology. Students employ psychological research methods throughout the course, including ethical considerations, as they use the scientific method, evaluate claims and evidence, and effectively communicate ideas.
The AP Chemistry course provides students with a college-level foundation to support future advanced coursework in chemistry. Students cultivate their understanding of chemistry through inquiry-based investigations as they explore content such as atomic structure, intermolecular forces and bonding, chemical reactions, kinetics, thermodynamics, and equilibrium. The AP Chemistry course is designed to be the equivalent of the general chemistry course usually taken during the first college year.

Mathematics

The sixth-grade math course is designed to reinforce basic math skills from earlier grade levels and introduce new math concepts that students will need in order to be successful in future math classes, such as algebra and geometry. Sixth-grade math students work extensively with estimating, decimals, fractions, and mixed numbers as well as ratios, percentages, integers, algebraic concepts, geometric formulas, and statistics. Real-world problem solving and implementing various representations of mathematical concepts will be integral to this course. Discussing ideas, working with partners and groups, and sharing methods and solutions with the class will be expected of students.
The Pre-Algebra course is to serve as a bridge between elementary mathematics and Algebra.  This course will build a foundation of algebraic concepts through the use of technology, manipulatives, problem-solving, and cooperative learning.  Students will learn to utilize the graphing calculator in appropriate situations.  Concepts include algebraic expressions, linear equations, polynomials, factoring, inequalities, geometry, statistics, and graphing. Problem-solving, reasoning, estimation, and connections between math and everyday applications will be emphasized throughout Pre-Algebra.  This course is designed to prepare students for Algebra I. This is a one-credit course if taken at the high school level.
Algebra 1 is the first year in a three-year college preparatory math sequence. Algebra 1 focuses on the structure of the real number system. This course examines symbolic representations in solving real-world problems. Linear, quadratic, systems of equations, and problem-solving are investigated. Graphing, both as a means of displaying data and analyzing data in one or two dimensions, is an integral part of this course. Review is built into every section and unit of study. A sound foundation in arithmetic and prealgebra skills is essential for success in this course. Students will learn how to use the graphing calculator as a problem-solving tool in this class.
This course will allow students to develop an understanding of the world we live in through geometric formulas, two and three-dimensional figures, inductive and deductive reasoning to include logic and proofs.  This course will provide a solid foundation of Euclidean geometry for all students and give them the opportunity to develop life-long problem-solving and reasoning skills. Students will be given the opportunity to review, strengthen, and learn fundamental concepts and skills throughout the school year. Students will engage in both independent and group explorations of concepts of geometry using multiple representations: numerical, graphical, analytical, and verbal.  They will make connections between algebra and geometry, as well as how these concepts may be applied in the real world.   Students will be required to evaluate, interpret, and support solutions through written and oral communication with and without the aid of a graphing calculator.
This course continues the development of functions and the analysis of their characteristics.  The course will continue the discussion of algebraic functions and will introduce students to transcendental functions including exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions.  Students will be given the opportunity to review, strengthen, and learn fundamental skills and concepts of algebra through independent and group explorations of functions using multiple representations: numerical, graphical, analytical, and verbal.  They will make connections between the various representations, as well as the underlying connection of all concepts taught over the course of the school year and how they may be applied in the real world.  Students will be required to evaluate, interpret, and support solutions through written and oral communication with and without the aid of a graphing calculator.
This course will provide students with a deeper understanding of the fundamental concepts, characteristics, behaviors, relationships, and representations of functions.  They will expand their knowledge of functions studied in Algebra 2 with Trigonometry as well as be introduced to conic sections, parametric, and polar equations.  Students will be working at a college level in terms of rigor and pace.  Students will be given the opportunity to review, strengthen, and develop mathematical skills and concepts through independent and group explorations of functions using multiple representations: numerical, graphical, analytical, and verbal.  They will make connections between the various representations, as well as the underlying connection of all concepts taught over the course of the school year and how they may be applied in the real world.  Students will be required to evaluate, interpret, and support solutions through written and oral communication with and without the aid of a graphing calculator.
These two courses are designed to develop the topics of differential and integral calculus. Emphasis is placed on limits, continuity, derivatives, and integrals of algebraic and transcendental functions of one variable. Upon completion, students should be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to derivative-related problems with and without technology.
Statistics is an Upper School Mathematics course.  The instructor will utilize modern educational tools, including laptop computer integration, graphing calculator manipulation, and interactive problem solving via the internet to assist students with gaining a more thorough understanding of course applications as they apply to the real world.   This is a one-year course in which students will further develop their understanding of data and its interpretation.  The course provides a concept-based approach to statistics, providing students with the opportunity to learn how to; determine which statistical procedures are appropriate to use and when, instruct the selected software to carry out procedures, and interpret output.

Design

Sixth Grade Design and Technology will introduce students to the engineering design process and various skills that are used by today’s workforce to creatively solve problems and evaluate those solutions.  The curriculum will include STEM concepts, including coding and robotics.  Students will work independently and in small groups to simulate real-world work scenarios as much as possible.
Seventh Grade Design and Technology focuses on computer-aided design (CAD), which is a computer skill used by modern engineers and architects to create, modify, analyze, and improve a design.  This course is focused on hands-on learning using web-based design applications and computer software to solve problems by using the design cycle.  Students will learn mechanical and architectural drafting skills to execute three-dimensional designs and drawings of their own creations as well as assigned projects.  These projects will include everyday objects, buildings, bridges, cities, and digital videos to showcase the work.  Some of the projects will be printed using the school’s 3D printers.
Eighth Grade Design and Technology is an introductory computer science course that takes a wide lens on computer science by covering topics such as problem-solving, programming, physical computing, user-centered design, and data while inspiring students as they follow the design process to build their own websites, apps, animations, games, and physical computing systems. The majority of the curriculum will come from Code.org’s Computer Science Discoveries course, which follows CSTA standards. This course will provide a foundation for future computer science classes.
Students will understand the engineering design process deeper while applying math, science, and engineering standards to hands-on projects. Students will work individually and in teams to design solutions to various problems and have extensive use of 3D modeling software to aid in problem solutions.
Students will engage in problem-solving challenges through a broad range of engineering topics, including Mechanics, Strength of Structure, Materials Science, and Automation. Students will continue to develop skills in problem-solving, research, and design. Students will learn and apply design documentation, collaboration, and presentation strategies.
AP Computer Science Principles is an introductory college-level computing course that introduces students to the breadth of the field of computer science. Students learn to design and evaluate solutions and apply computer science to solve problems through the development of algorithms and programs. They incorporate abstraction into programs and use data to discover new knowledge. Students also explain how computing innovations and computing systems - including the Internet - work, explore their potential impacts and contribute to a computing culture that is collaborative and ethical.

 

AP Computer Science A introduces students to computer science through programming.  Fundamental topics in this course include the design of solutions to problems, the use of data structures to organize large sets of data, the development and implementation of algorithms to process data and discover new information, the analysis of potential solutions, and the ethical and social implications of computing systems.  The course emphasizes object-oriented programming and design using the Java programming language.

 

Arts

The standards for grade six emphasize exploration.  Using the elements of art and the principles of design as a framework, students investigate a variety of experiences and concepts.  Students explore various two-dimensional and three-dimensional art media using a variety of expressive and technical approaches.  Students are brought to understand the factors that distinguish artistic styles that clarify the role of art in American Culture. Through critical examination, students will determine how artists convey meaning through the use of forms, media, and symbols. Students will test and develop their own ideas regarding the nature of art and will encounter philosophical and ethical questions.  Upon the successful completion of the visual arts standards for grade six, students will possess the skills that will allow them to evaluate the effects of various influences on the discipline of the visual arts.
The standards for grade seven continue to emphasize exploration, analysis, and investigation of the creative process.  Students develop technical skills that empower them to communicate ideas visually, with the focus on realistic representations of their environment.  Students acquire knowledge that permits them to identify art styles and the periods to which they belong.  In addition, they become aware of a variety of art careers that they may consider.  They develop inquiry skills and vocabulary as they explore the meaning of works of art through analysis of the subject matter, themes, and symbols.  Students develop an increased awareness of the nature of art and of their relationship to it as they explore the meaning and value of works of art.
The standards in grade eight focus on the syntheses and application of previously learned concepts.  Using traditional and emerging technologies, students are able to apply more complex technical skills as they manipulate the elements of art and the principles of design, art media, and ideas.  Students acquire art skills that enable them to make conscious choices of media and techniques for expressive purposes. Students produce works of art that are developed from preliminary ideas and sketches. Students debate the purposes of art, formulate reasoned responses to meaningful art questions, develop their own criteria for making art judgments, and develop a personal aesthetic. Students make connections between previous art experiences and other areas of knowledge.
This two-year sequence of Art I and Art II emphasizes the development of abilities to recognize visual arts content, concepts, and skills to create, discuss, and understand original works of art. The standards represent a thematic approach to visual communication and production, cultural context and art history, judgment and criticism, and aesthetics through which students will develop understanding and appreciation for the visual arts.
Art III continues to emphasize the development of abilities to organize and analyze visual arts content, concepts, and skills in creating works of art. The focus on art history, critical evaluation, and aesthetics is increased and includes cultural and stylistic issues and creative problem-solving. Study at this level affords students the opportunity to develop a personal direction in the production of their works of art or to further their academic study in the visual arts. Selected works of art and other products will be added to the portfolio and carried forward to the next level of study.
The 3D Art and Design course presents an inquiry-based approach to learning about and making forms and structures in art and design. Students are expected to conduct an in-depth, sustained investigation of materials, processes, concepts, and ideas in three dimensions.
 
The framework focuses on concepts and skills to help students become inquisitive, thoughtful artists and designers who can create, explore, and develop works and articulate information about their work. 3-D Art and Design students develop and apply inquiry and investigation skills, practice, experimentation, exploration, revision, communication, and reflection.
The middle school ensemble program will provide a means of self-expression to convey emotions and develop self-esteem and aesthetic sensitivity.  The program will develop musical skills on an instrument and develop an understanding of intellectual knowledge about music through a sequential order of learning.  Students grow in their understanding of musical concepts and they acquire the necessary skills for manipulating their musical environment.
Songwriting & Folk Music (G9-12), Semester 1:
  • Songwriting
    • Organizing ideas and inspirations
    • Transforming musical ideas into actions
    • Introduction to Digital Audio Workstations (DAW)
    • Lyric Creation
    • Introduction to Music Theory
    • Creating charts/sheet music
    • Maintaining a personal song catalog
  • Folk Music from Around the Globe:
    • Continent of Focus: Asia
    • Developing and expressing personal and cultural identities
    • How the arts innovate and communicate across time and culture
    • Become informed and reflective practitioners of the arts
    • Appreciate lifelong learning and enjoyment of the arts
Brass & Percussion Ensemble (G9-12), Semester 2:
 
- Beginners with no experience are welcome to join this class. You may choose between the following instruments that you'll learn throughout the semester: Bb Trumpet, French Horn, Trombone, Baritone/Euphonium, Tuba or Snare Drum. (A limited number of Snare Drum players will be selected)
- Leadership and conducting opportunities will be available for students with extensive previous music experience.
- Instrument rental or purchase for ALL instruments will need to be arranged prior to the start of semester 2.
  • Introduction to Music Theory: rhythms, scales, improvisation, sight-reading, repertoire
  • Performance: individual instrument technique, core musical concepts (intonation, timbre, rhythm, phrasing, dynamics, articulation, expression, tempo, harmony), self-confidence, Winter Concert in December, additional performances throughout the semester
  • Music History: Development of music from Baroque Era to Present, early American musical styles (Blues, Spirituals, Ragtime, Marches, Hymns, etc.)
- Theory and Performance objectives are dependent on student's individual skill levels: Novice, Intermediate, Proficient, Accomplished and Advanced as specified in the National Core Arts Standards for Music for Traditional and Emerging Ensembles.
The Middle School Drama program will provide a means of self-expression to convey emotions and develop self-esteem and aesthetic sensitivity.  The program will develop performing skills and develop an understanding of intellectual knowledge about drama through a sequential order of learning.  Students grow in their understanding of dramatic concepts and they acquire the necessary skills for manipulating their environment. Topics covered will include: History of Theater, Audition Basics, Backstage Crew, Becoming the Role, Rehearsal Etiquette, and Acting.

 

The Upper School Drama program will continue to provide a means of self-expression to convey emotions and develop self-esteem and aesthetic sensitivity.  The program will develop performing skills and develop an understanding of intellectual knowledge about drama through a sequential order of learning.  Students grow in their understanding of dramatic concepts and they acquire the necessary skills for manipulating their environment. They will continue the skills developed in middle school and extend them to a deeper understanding of performance and how it can influence the audience.

Physical Education

The sixth grade P. E. program is designed to develop and promote total wellness throughout life, better one’s sports skills in a variety of sports, better one’s locomotive and spatial awareness, and increase the level of teamwork.

 

The seventh grade P. E. program is designed to develop and promote total wellness throughout life, better one’s sports skills, refine motor skills (gross and fine motor skills), and increase the understanding and practice of teamwork.
The eighth grade P. E. program is designed to develop and promote total wellness throughout life, better one’s sports skills, refine motor skills (gross and fine motor skills), increase understanding, and practice teamwork.
MYP physical and health education aims to empower students to understand and appreciate the value of being physically active and develop the motivation for making healthy life choices. To this end, physical and health education courses foster the development of knowledge, skills, and attitudes that will contribute to a student’s balanced and healthy lifestyle. Through opportunities for active learning, courses in this subject group embody and promote the holistic nature of well-being. Students engaged in physical and health education will explore a variety of concepts that help foster an awareness of physical development and health perspectives, empowering them to make informed decisions and promoting positive social interaction.

 

MYP physical and health education aims to empower students to understand and appreciate the value of being physically active and develop the motivation for making healthy life choices. To this end, physical and health education courses foster the development of knowledge, skills, and attitudes that will contribute to a student’s balanced and healthy lifestyle. Through opportunities for active learning, courses in this subject group embody and promote the holistic nature of well-being. Students engaged in physical and health education will explore a variety of concepts that help foster an awareness of physical development and health perspectives, empowering them to make informed decisions and promoting positive social interaction.
This is an elective course where students can focus on athletic training, strength, and conditioning in a personalized way and develop individual goals for improvement.





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